Skip to main content

South Carolina peaches poised for strong season


Overview of the upcoming South Carolina peaches season by Tim Linden, complemented by charts from Agronometrics.



Original published in TheProduceNews on May 14, 2020

With no major weather or production issues to contend with, the South Carolina peach industry is looking forward to an excellent season, with shipments expected from mid-May through the heat of the summer.

“We are expecting a very good season with good volume from May 15 through August,” said Kyle Tisdale, a marketing specialist for the South Carolina Department of Agriculture, who also serves as executive director of the industry-funded South Carolina Peach Council. “Some growers will get going a little bit before May 15 and some will last into September.”

Volumes (in KG) of peaches from South Carolina in the US market


Source: USDA Market News via Agronometrics.
(Agronometrics users can view this chart with live updates here)

South Carolina only trails California in the production of peaches as it far outdistances the production of nearby Georgia and tops New Jersey, which came in third place in 2019. Tisdale called the 2020 production an average crop in volume. “It’s not a huge crop but there will be plenty of fruit for both halves of the season.”

Volumes (in KG) of peaches in the US market during the 2019 South Carolina season


Source: USDA Market News via Agronometrics.
(Agronometrics users can view this chart with live updates here)

He said the first month (May 15 to June 15) of the season often has to contend with weather issues, which can decrease the volume, but that hasn’t been the case this year. Top production usually comes in the mid-June through July period with the Fourth of July typically signaling the peak of the season.

Tisdale and the SCPC were in the middle of planning this year’s promotion program when he was interviewed in late-April. The Peach Council is altering its focus a bit this year and is “thinking outside the box” because of the COVID-19 situation. Promoting the merchandising of South Carolina peaches throughout the Southeast is always central to the program, but this year Tisdale said the council’s looking at other avenues for sales as well, including on-line shopping, direct deliveries, roadside stands and farmer’s markets.

“We are looking at all the opportunities and we are focusing on the health benefits of South Carolina peaches.”

He said that every year the core of the program is to convince retailers east of the Mississippi to carry peaches from the Southeast. “We consider western peaches to be our competition,” he said, adding that the goal is to get South Carolina and the surrounding states to focus on the peach production from the region. “We want supermarkets in the Southeast to carry peaches from the Southeast,” he said.

Tisdale said the state’s packer/shippers generally consider any market east of the Mississippi to be in play. “We mostly go up and down the East Coast and throughout the Southeast,” he said, adding that each shipper has its own game plan. “We are very strong in the Northeast.”

With its promotional dollars, the South Carolina Peach Council works with retailers, attends trade shows and puts together programs to specifically promote South Carolina peaches. It also works closely with the state’s Certified South Carolina, which identifies and promotes the state’s agricultural production.

Again, because of the coronavirus, the South Carolina Peach Council is altering its plan a bit this year to do more online promotions to retailers and consumers. Tisdale said SCPC launched a new website in the past year, www.scpeach.org, and will be communicating its message through several different social media platforms. He reiterated that the focus on the health benefits of peaches is especially timely in these challenging times. The website also encourages consumers to use the state’s peaches in a variety of recipes including Palmetto Peach Ice Cream, Peachy French Toast and Southern Sangria.

“We believe that’s a fun way to promote our peaches,” he said.

Tisdale said South Carolina peach production is relatively stable, but it is growing a bit as new acreage is being planted. Most of the state’s production is destined for the fresh market, typically shipped in 25-pound cartons. According to the USDA National Agricultural Statistic Service, South Carolina produced 93,000 tons or 186 million pounds of peaches in 2019.

The News in Charts is a collection of stories from the industry complemented by charts from Agronometrics to help better tell their story.

Access the original article with this (Link)

Popular posts from this blog

Agronometrics in Charts: Demand for berries skyrockets in 2021

This time for the ‘In Charts’ series we will give an update as to how the average prices of berries have been behaving. Specifically, we will look at the prices of blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, and blackberries in the United States market and compare them with previous seasons. An increase in demand, brought on by the tendency to consume “superfoods” such as berries during the Covid-19 pandemic, seem to have pushed prices up despite the fact that volumes imported by the United States have been similar or higher than those of previous years. Let's look at each particular case: Blueberries Blueberry prices experienced a significant increase from week 3 of 2021, showing the highest prices of the last 5 seasons for the same date. If we observe the following chart, we can see that, for week 7 of 2021, the average price of conventional blueberries was $7.60 per kilo. This is 24 percent higher than in 2020 when the average price was $6.14 per kilo. Volumes for blueberr

Peru's blueberry oversupply takes its toll on export price

Overview of the Peruvian blueberry season, complemented by charts from Agronometrics.   Original published in FreshPlaza.com   on November 25, 2020  This year's Peruvian blueberry season began in June with the export of 1,010 tons worth 5 million dollars. These figures represented a 25% increase in volume and a 77% increase in value over the same month of 2019. The lower production in the northern hemisphere due to weather problems allowed producers to achieve attractive prices of $ 5.15 per kilogram in June. Volume (in Kg) of blueberry from Perú in the US market Source: USDA Market News via Agronometrics . (Agronometrics users can view this chart with live updates here ) The good reception of Peruvian blueberries and the increase in prices encouraged exports during July, a month in which the country shipped 4,808 tons (+ 108%) for 26 million dollars (+ 102%). In this month, the increase in the Peruvian supply generated a slight 3% fall in the typical prices of the month,

Tight raspberry volumes make for more “normal” pricing

Overview of the raspberry supply by Ben Escoe of Twin River Berries, complemented by charts from Agronometrics. Original published in FreshPlaza.com   on May 12, 2021  “They’re starting to pick up, but it’s been tight--really tight,” says Ben Escoe of Twin River Berries in Portland, OR, noting this largely has to do with the weather conditions in Mexico. “It’s been cold and windy there which has caused damage in the fields and contributed to the low supply. Year over year, the volume is comparable or even better. But demand is high and forecast to actual supply has been lower.” Mexico grows raspberries for most of the year, stopping only for the rainy season which begins at the end of June or early July. Meanwhile California’s volume won’t really begin until the middle to the end of May. Volumes (in Kg) of raspberries from Mexico in the US Market​ Source: USDA Market News via Agronometrics . (Agronometrics users can view this chart with live updates here ) Higher berry deman